Percival Henry Gwynne James, RN

Born  12 May 1896


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Ranks

15 Sep 1915 A/S.Lt.
15 May 1916 S.Lt.
15 Nov 1917 Lt.
15 Nov 1925 Lt.Cdr.
31 Dec 1931 Cdr.
30 Jun 1938 Capt.

Retired: 12 Jan 1948


Decorations

Warship Commands listed for Percival Henry Gwynne James, RN


ShipRankTypeFromTo
HMS Peterel (T 21)Capt.River gunboat5 Jan 1940Oct 1940
HMS Capetown (D 88)Capt.Light cruiser3 Nov 194018 Jun 1941
HMS Capetown (D 88)Capt.Light cruiser7 Dec 194120 Dec 1941
HMS Capetown (D 88)Capt.Light cruiser14 Feb 19428 Nov 1942

Career information

We currently have no career / biographical information on this officer.

Events related to this officer

Light cruiser HMS Capetown (D 88)


6 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) conducted gunnery exercises off Singapore. On completing course was set for Penang escorting the river gunboat Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN). (1)

8 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN) arrived at Penang. After topping off with fuel they departed again later the same day for Nancowry. (1)

10 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN) arrived at Nancowry. HMS Capetown briefly grounded but no damage was sustained. (1)

10 Nov 1940 (position 6.29, 90.16)
The German armed merchant cruiser Atlantis (Schiff 16) captured the Norwegian tanker Ole Jacob (8306 GRT, built 1939) in the Bay of Bengal, west of the Nicobar Islands in position 06°29'N, 90°16'E. On receiving a raider report from the tanker the Commander-in-Chief East Indies despatched the heavy cruiser HMAS Canberra (Capt. H.B. Farncomb, RAN), light cruisers HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN), HMS Durban (Capt. J.A.S. Eccles, RN) and armed merchant cruiser HMAS Westralia (A/Capt.(Emgy.) H.V. Hudson, OBE, RAN) to search for the German raider, but none made contact with the German ship. (2)

11 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Nancowry for anti raider patrol and onwards to Colombo. (1)

13 Nov 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Colombo from Nancowry.

After fuelling she departed again for anti-raider patrol and onwards to Nancowry. (3)

16 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Nancowry to escort the river gunboat Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN) to Colombo. (1)

20 Nov 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN) departed Nancowry for Penang. Weather conditions in the Bay of Bengal were unsuitable for the shallow draft river gunboat for the passage to Colombo. (3)

22 Nov 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and Cricket (Lt. J.L. Goatley, RN) arrived at Penang.

HMS Capetown departed again later the same day to return to Nancowry. (3)

23 Nov 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Nancowry. (1)

24 Nov 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Nancowry to patrol in the Bay of Bengal and then onwards to Colombo. (1)

30 Nov 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Colombo from patrol. (1)

1 Dec 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Colombo for escort duty with convoy US 7.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy US 7 ' for 14 November 1940.] (4)

5 Dec 1940
HMAS Perth (Capt. P.W. Bowyer-Smith, RN) and HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Colombo with convoy US 7. (5)

7 Dec 1940
HMAS Perth (Capt. P.W. Bowyer-Smith, RN) and HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Colombo escorting convoy US 7.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy US 7 ' for 14 November 1940.] (6)

12 Dec 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Aden after convoy escort duty. (4)

13 Dec 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Aden for patrol in the Indian Ocean. (4)

20 Dec 1940
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) made a short stop at Addu Atoll to fuel and then departed again to resume patrol. (4)

24 Dec 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Colombo from patrol. (4)

29 Dec 1940 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Colombo to patrol off the Bay of Bengal to the south-east and east of Ceylon. (7)

6 Jan 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Trincomalee from patrol (7)

8 Jan 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Trincomalee for patrol. She is ordered to patrol to the south-east of Ceylon. (7)

13 Jan 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Colombo from patrol. (7)

29 Jan 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Aden for a patrol which was to end at Kilindini / Mombasa. During the patrol she was to make a call at Port Victoria, Seychelles to fuel. (8)

4 Feb 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) made a short call at Port Victoria, Seychelles to fuel. On completion of which she departed again to resume patrol.

On 6 February she joined convoy WS 5A but parted company again the following morning.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy WS 5A and the attack by the German heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper ' for 18 December 1940.] (9)

11 Feb 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Kilindini / Mombasa from patrol. (9)

22 Feb 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Kilindini / Mombasa for the Seychelles. (10)

25 Feb 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) made a short stop at Port Victoria, Seychelles. She then departed again to make rendezvous with convoy WS 5X.

[For more info on this convoy see the event ' Convoy WS 5B ' for 7 January 1941.] (9)

3 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Enterprise (Capt. J.C. Annesley, DSO, RN) and HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bombay with convoy WS 5X. (11)

18 Mar 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Aden after convoy escort duty. (12)

18 Mar 1941

Convoy BS 20.

This convoy departed Suez on 18 March 1941.

It was made up of the following transports; Adelfotis (Greek, 5838 GRT, built 1917), Balzac (British, 5372 GRT, built 1920), Diamantis (British, 5253 GRT, built 1919), Drupa (British, 8102 GRT, built 1939), Goldmouth (British, 7402 GRT, built 1927), Hopecrown (British, 5180 GRT, built 1937), Hydraios (Greek, 4476 GRT, built 190) and Petros J. Goulandris (British, 4693 GRT, built 1923).

The convoy was escorted by the sloop HMS Clive (Cdr. H.R. Inigo-Jones, RIN).

On 19 March 1941, HMIS Clive parted company to return to Port Said. The convoy then proceeded unescorted until it was joined on 21 March 1941 when the sloop HMS Auckland (Cdr. E.G. Hewitt, DSO, RN) joined having just parted company with convoy BN 20.

On 22 March they were joined by the transports (Dutch, 7886 GRT, built 1920) and Anna Odland (Norwegian, 4980 GRT, built 1939) coming from Port Sudan escorted by the light cruiser HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) which also joined the convoy.

Also on 22 March 1941, the transport Rahmani (British, 5463 GRT, built 1928) joined coming from Jeddah.

At dawn on 25 March 1941, HMS Capetown parted company with the convoy to join convoy BN 21.

The convoy was dissolved in the Gulf of Aden on 26 March 1941.

19 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Aden for Bombay. (13)

20 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
In the morning, HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN), which was on passage from Aden to Bombay, is ordered to proceed to Port Sudan. Course was therefore reversed to proceed to the Red Sea. (13)

21 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Port Sudan. (13)

22 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Port Sudan for escort duty with convoy BS 20 and BN 21.

[For more info on these convoys see the events ' Convoy BS 20 ' for 18 March 1941 and ' Convoy BN 21 ' for 24 March 1941.] (14)

24 Mar 1941

Convoy BN 21.

This convoy departed Aden on 24 March 1941.

It was made up of the following merchant vessels; Arena (Norwegian (tanker), 6362 GRT, built 1927), Baron Jedburgh (British, 3656 GRT, built 1936), Beaconsfield (British, 4635 GRT, built 1938), Bintang (British, 2825 GRT, built 1922), Bucegi (British, 4501 GRT, built 1913), Cabarita (British, 4364 GRT, built 1915), Captain A.F. Lucas (Panamanian, 4188 GRT, built 1904), Clan Fraser (British, 7529 GRT, built 1938), Clan MacTavish (British, 7631 GRT, built 1921), Eidanger (Norwegian (tanker), 9432 GRT, built 1938), Fingal (Norwegian, 2137 GRT, built 1923), Garmula (British, 5254 GRT, built 1920), G.S. Livanos (Greek, 4835 GRT, built 1937), Hatarana (British, 7522 GRT, built 1917), Hermion (Norwegian, 5202 GRT, built 1937), Jalamani (British, 3944 GRT, built 1929), Katha (British, 4357 GRT, built 1938), Manoula (Greek, 1966 GRT, built 1920), Maria Stathatos (Greek, 6303 GRT, built 1922), Modasa (British, 9070 GRT, built 1921), Narbada (British, 8988 GRT, built 1915), Northern Prince (British, 10917 GRT, built 1929), Ovula (Dutch (tanker), 6256 GRT, built 1938), Rizwani (British, 5448 GRT, built 1930), San Rafael (Panamanian, 5379 GRT, built 1919) and Warialda (British, 3135 GRT, built 1918).

The convoy was escorted by the sloop HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN).

Of the above ships the Bintang, Bucegi, Fingal and Manoula had already departed Aden on 23 March due to their slow speed. They were to be overtaken and joined later by the main convoy.

On 25 March 1941 the convoy was joined by the light cruiser HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN).

On 27 March 1941, the transports Bucegi, Cabarita, Eidanger, Narbada and Rizwani parted company with the convoy to proceed to Port Sudan where they arrived later the same day.

Both escorts also parted company to proceed to Port Sudan.

The convoy continued on unescorted and arrived at Suez on 31 March 1941.

24 Mar 1941

Convoy BS 21.

This convoy departed Suez on 24 March 1941.

It was made up of the following merchant vessels; Afghanistan (British, 6992 GRT, built 1940), Andreas (Greek, 6566 GRT, built 1919), Arundo (Dutch, 5163 GRT, built 1930), Benalder (British, 5161 GRT, built 1919), Bosanka (Yuguslavian, 3456 GRT, built 1905), Christos Markettos (Greek, 5209 GRT, built 1919), City of Dundee (British, 5273 GRT, built 1921), City of Leicester (British, 3351 GRT, built 1926), Condylis (Greek, 4439 GRT, built 1914), Corona (Norwegian, 3264 GRT, built 1920), Doris (Greek,4604 GRT, built 1917), Efthalia Mari (Greek, 4195 GRT, built 1919), El Segundo (Panamanian (tanker), 3664 GRT, built 1912), Empire Ability (British, 7603 GRT, built 1931), Hatasu (British, 3198 GRT, built 1921), Intrepido (Panamanian, 2130 GRT, built 1920), Irene S. Embiricos (Greek, 4164 GRT, built 1927), Leana (British, 4742 GRT, built 1914), Maliakos (Greek, 3903 GRT, built 1912), Nevasa (British, 9213 GRT, built 1913), Odysseus (British, 4577 GRT, built 1913), Rosalie Moller (British, 3963 GRT, built 1910), Spyros (Greek, 6629 GRT, built 1918), Tassia (Greek, 3034 GRT, built 1904), Vacport (British (tanker), 6774 GRT, built 1930), Wilford (Norwegian, 2158 GRT, built 1921) and Woolgar (Norwegian, 3060 GRT, built 1914).

On departure from Suez the convoy was escorted by the light cruiser HMS Caledon (A/Cdr. C.S. Britton, RN).

In the morning of the 28th, off Port Sudan, the convoy was joined by the light cruiser HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and the sloop HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN).

Also at that time the convoy merged with convoy SU 3.

HMS Caledon parted company with the combined convoy on 29 March 1941 and proceeded to Port Sudan arriving there on the 30th.

On the 30th the combined convoy escort was joined by the sloop HMS Shoreham (Cdr. G.P. Claridge, RN) which then took over from HMS Capetown which then proceeded to Port Sudan arriving there on 31 March.

On 31 March the combined convoy was joined by the sloop HMIS Hindustan (Cdr. G.V.G. Beamish, RIN).

The combined convoy was dispersed on 1 April 1941.

25 Mar 1941

Convoy SU 3.

This convoy departed Suez on 25 March 1941.

it was made up of the following (troop) transports; Adviser (British, 6348 GRT, built 1939), Barrister (British, 6348 GRT, built 1939), Bhutan (British, 6104 GRT, built 1929), Clan MacAulay (British, 10492 GRT, built 1936), Durban Castle (British, 17388 GRT, built 1938), Nea Hellas (British, 16991 GRT, built 1922), Nurmahal (British, 5419 GRT, built 1923), Orbita (British, 15495 GRT, built 1915) and Westernland (Dutch, 16479 GRT, built 1918).

On departure from Aden the convoy was not escorted.

On 28 March 1941, off Port Sudan, the convoy merged with convoy BS 21. From then on the combined convoy was being escorted by the light cruisers HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN), HMS Caledon (A/Cdr. C.S. Britton, RN) and the sloop HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN).

HMS Caledon parted company with the combined convoy on 29 March 1941 and proceeded to Port Sudan arriving there on the 30th.

On the 30th the combined convoy escort was joined by the sloop HMS Shoreham (Cdr. G.P. Claridge, RN) which then took over from HMS Capetown which then proceeded to Port Sudan arriving there on 31 March.

On 31 March the combined convoy was joined by the sloop HMIS Hindustan (Cdr. G.V.G. Beamish, RIN).

The combined convoy was dispersed on 1 April 1941. (15)

27 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN) arrived at Port Sudan after convoy escort duty. (16)

28 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) and HMS Flamingo (Cdr. J.H. Huntley, RN) departed Port Sudan for escort duty with the combined convoy BS 21 / SU 3.

[For more info on this combined convoy see the events ' Convoy BS 21 ' for 24 March 1941 and ' Convoy SU 3 ' for 25 March 1941.] (16)

31 Mar 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Port Sudan after convoy escort duty. (12)

1 Apr 1941

Operation Atmosphere and the torpedoing of HMS Capetown.

Operations in the Red Sea against the port of Massawa in Eritrea.

The operation was desinged to furnish a swept channel from the sea approach to Mersa Kuba, in approximate position 16°10'N, 39°14'E, through the North Massawa Channel. A convoy of supply ships and lighters were then to proceed to that place to establish there a advanced base for supplies to the coastal military forces advancing to the assault on Massawa. For this operation the light cruiser HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) was to provide cover, destroyer HMS Kingston (Lt.Cdr. P. Somerville, DSO, DSC, RN) was to buoy the swept channel with dans. The Channel itself was to be swept by the minesweeping sloop HMAS Parramatta (Lt.Cdr. J.H. Walker, MVO, RAN). The patrol vessel Ratnagiri (Lt. H.M. Clark, RIN) and patrol yacht HMS Sagitta (Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) A.H. Straight, RNR) were to convey personnel and escort the convoy. They were also to evacuate possible casualties. The convoy itself consisted of 3 pontoons and a mooring barge towed by HMS Sagitta and the small tugs El Affia (129 GRT, built 1923) and El Kebir (129 GRT, built 1925). The El Affia also had minesweeping gear installed so that she could be used in that role if required. The supply ships were the El Fath (318 GRT, built 1918), Taif (1590 GRT, built 1928) and Velho (1100 GRT, built 1905).

1 April 1941.

Around 1030B/1, HMS Kingston and HMAS Parramatta departed Port Sudan. Around 1200B/1, HMS Capetown also departed Port Sudan.

HMS Kingston and HMAS Parramatta intended to be off Kavet Lighthouse in approximate position 16°58'N, 39°03'E at dawn on 2 April with HMS Capetown in a covering position to seaward.

2 April 1941.

At dawn on 2 April HMS Kingston and HMAS Parramatta were in position 16°40'N, 39°11'E. HMAS Parramatta then started to sweep with double Oropese sweeps through position 16°25'N, 39°15'5"E, to position 16°10'N, 39°14'5"E which was to the south of Mersa Kuba. HMS Kingston followed her through the swept channel and was danning the eastern side of the channel every two miles. After arrival off Mersa Kuba in the early afternoon, HMS Kingston set up a flag mark onshore while HMAS Parramatta commenced to return up the swept channel with starboard sweep to widen the channel. No mines were encountered.

The situation was however changing rapidly. The Army had invested Massawa and now called upon the Italian Forces to surrender. Air reconnaissance showed activity in the harbour, ships being scuttled and others leaving. An Italian destroyer had been sighted in the Dahlak Islands and others manoeuvering of the port. Changes were therefore made in the dispositions of all Red Sea Forces, and convoys at sea were turned back on the routes. Late on 2 April, HMS Capetown and HMS Kingston moved to seaward of the convoy routes to afford cover to an important convoy while HMAS Parramatta patrolled off shore near Kavet for the night. Apparently Italian destroyers must have passed close by during the night during their escape from Massawa to the north.

3 April 1941.

At dawn on 3 April, HMAS Parramatta moved to the south to continue widening the swept channel. Air reconnaissance sighted four Italian destroyers to the east of Port Sudan. These were then attacked by FAA and RAF aircraft. Two were sunk (Daniele Manin and Nazario Sauro) and two made off to the north-east (Pantera and Tigre).

After several miles of channel had been swept, HMAS Parramatta was ordered to withdraw to Mersa Teklay. She arrived there around 1600B/3 and anchored there.

HMS Kingston meanwhile prevented the two remaining Italian destroyers from proceeding towards Jeddah and these ships were eventually scuttled off the Arabian coast by their crews with nowhere else to go to.

At Massawa the Italians however refused to surrender and the Army renewed the attack.

4 April 1941.

At 0645B/4, the pontoon convoy escorted by HMS Sagitta and HMIS Ratnagiri arrived of Mersa Teklay. Preparations were then made to go ahead with the operation as planned, although HMS Capetown and HMS Kingston were still absent, hunting and later fuelling at Port Sudan.

At 1415B/4, HMAS Parramatta proceeded to Kavet and anchored there close to the shore ay 1715B/4 to assist the progress of the convoy to the south during the night. 5 April 1941.

At 0255B/5, the convoy was sighted and HMAS Parramatta thein weighted anchor and left the convoy to the commencement of the swept channel. She and the convoy arrived off Mersa Kuba around 1300B/5. HMS Capetown and the sloop HMS Indus (Cdr. Cdr. E.G.G. Hunt, RIN) already having arrived there.

The convoy then anchored while HMAS Parramatta began to sweep in the area for mines. Again no mines were encountered and sweeping was stopped around dusk when HMAS Parramatta anchored near the convoy for the night and to effect some repairs to her machinery.

HMS Capetown and HMIS Indus kept underway during the night patrolling in swept waters.

Meanwhile a start had been made to create a pontoon jetty and to unload the stores.

6 April 1941.

Massawa and the surrounding mainland fell to our Military Forces. HMAS Parramatta got underway and swept the remaining of the anchorage and then joined HMS Capetown and HMIS Indus on patrol at 1640B/5.

HMAS Parramatta and HMIS Indus were despatched during the night to recover the dan buoys as these would be required to mark a swept channel which was to be swept into Massawa harbour in the near future. Recovering the dan buoys proved very difficult during the night though.

7 April 1941.

Recovering the dan buoys was completed soon after dawn and both sloops rejoined HMS Capetown on patrol. HMS Parramatta was ordered at 0815B/7 to proceed to the northern end of the swept channel and escort the small transport Taif to Kaba where they both arrived shortly after 1330B/7. HMAS Parramatta then anchored near the convoy to conserve fuel. HMIS Indus did the same later in the day while HMS Capetown remained out on patrol during the night.

8 April 1941.

Then at 0115B/8, HMS Capetown was hit by a torpedo on the starboard side. This torpedo had been fired by the sole operational Italian MAS boat MAS 213. HMAS Parramatta and HMIS Indus then immediately weighted anchor and come to her aid. On their arrival near the stricken cruiser HMIS Indus commenced to patrol the area while HMAS Parramatta began to make preparations to take the damaged cruiser in tow.

By dawn (at 0445B/8) they were some miles from the anchorage bound for Port Sudan. An average speed of 5.5 knots could be maintained.

HMIS Indus meanwhile remained at Kaba, her Commanding Officer now having assumed the role of Senior Officer present.

Damage to HMS Capetown was serious, she had been hit in a boiler room and she was unable to proceed under her own power. Bulkheads just hold due to the fact that they had been shored up. She also had re revert to hand steering which made her a difficult tow. The tow arrived at Port Sudan in the forenoon of April, 10th. Four ratings had been killed in the attack.

The naval force finally entered Massawa on 15 April. [Further details to be researched in the future.] (17)

8 Apr 1941
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) is torpedoed and damaged near Massawa, Eritrea by the Italian motor torpedo boat MAS 213.

[For more information see the event ' Operation Atmosphere and the torpedoing of HMS Capetown ' for 1 April 1941.]

10 Apr 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
The damaged HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Port Sudan for temporary repairs. (14)

5 May 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
With her temporary repairs completed, HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Port Sudan under tow of the tug Taikoo for Aden and ultimately Bombay. (18)

10 May 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Aden under tow. (19)

11 May 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Aden for Bombay. She was still being towed by the tug Taikoo. They were being escorted by the special service vessel HMS Botlea (Cdr.(Retd. T.I. Scott-Bell, DSO, RN). (18)

20 May 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN), in tow of the tug Taikoo and escorted by the special service vessel HMS Botlea (Cdr.(Retd. T.I. Scott-Bell, DSO, RN), arrived at Bombay where she was to be taken in hand at the Royal Dockyard for repairs. (18)

22 May 1941 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) is docked in the Duncan Dry Dock at the Bombay Dockyard for battle-damage repairs. (19)

13 Mar 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) is docked in the Merewether Dry Dock at Bombay. (20)

14 Mar 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) is undocked.

[Note no logs are available for the period of May / July 1942, so details of these months will be missing.] (20)

14 Jul 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Bombay for the Persian Gulf. (21)

17 Jul 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Khor Kuwai to join the Persian Gulf Flotilla. (21)

1 Aug 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

2 Aug 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

4 Aug 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

6 Aug 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

8 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Khor Kuwai to Sharjah. (22)

9 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Sharjah to Khor Kuwai. (22)

10 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

11 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

12 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

13 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Khor Kuwai to Khasab Bay. (22)

14 Aug 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded Khasab Bay to Khor Kuwai. (22)

15 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Khor Kuwai to Khasab Bay. (22)

16 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khasab Bay to patrol in the Strait of Hormuz. She returned from patrol late the following day. (22)

18 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khasab Bay for Bahrain. (22)

19 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bahrain from Khasab Bay. (22)

27 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Bahrain for Khor Kuwai. (22)

28 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Khor Kuwai from Bahrein. (22)

31 Aug 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
During 31 August / 1 September 1942, HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN), patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (22)

2 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in Clarence Strait. (22)

3 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from the Clarence Strait to Khor Kuwai. (22)

4 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khor Kuwai to patrol in Clarence Strait. (22)

5 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from the Clarence Strait to Khor Kuwai. (22)

6 Sep 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) patrolled in the Strait of Hormuz. (23)

7 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khor Kuwai to patrol in Clarence Strait. (23)

10 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from the Clarence Strait to Khor Kuwai. (23)

12 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khor Kuwai to patrol in Clarence Strait. (23)

14 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from the Clarence Strait to Khor Kuwai. (23)

16 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded Khor Kuwai to Khasab Bay. (23)

17 Sep 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khasab Bay to patrol in Clarence Strait and then onwards to Kuwait. (23)

19 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Kuwait. (23)

27 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Kuwait to Kharg Island. (23)

29 Sep 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Kharg Island for Bahrein. (23)

30 Sep 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bahrein. She departed for Clarence Strait later the same day. (23)

2 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Sharjah from patrol in the Clarence Strait. (24)

5 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Sharjah for Bahrein. (24)

6 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bahrein from Sharjah. (24)

10 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Bahrein for Rooka. (24)

11 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Rooka from Bahrein. She departed for Clarence Strait later the same day. (24)

14 Oct 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Clarence Strait to Khor Kuwai. (24)

15 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) proceeded from Khor Kuwai to Sharjah.

She departed Sharjah later the same day for Bahrein. (24)

16 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bahrein from Sharjah. (24)

17 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Bahrein for Khasab Bay. (24)

21 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Khasab Bay for Bombay. She had been delayed for a few days due to evaporator trouble. (25)

24 Oct 1942 (position 0.00, 0.00)
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Bombay from the Persian Gulf. (24)

29 Oct 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) departed Bombay for Kilindini / Mombasa. (24)

5 Nov 1942
HMS Capetown (Capt. P.H.G. James, RN) arrived at Kilindini / Mombasa from Bombay. (24)

Sources

  1. ADM 53/111700
  2. Personal communication
  3. ADM 53/111700 + ADM 199/383
  4. ADM 53/111701
  5. ADM 53/111701 + Report of proceedings of HMAS Perth from 27 November 1940 to 31 December 1940
  6. ADM 53/111701 + ADM 199/383 + Report of proceedings of HMAS Perth from 27 November 1940 to 31 December 1940
  7. ADM 53/113803
  8. ADM 53/113803 + ADM 199/2549
  9. ADM 53/113804
  10. ADM 53/113804 + ADM 199/408
  11. ADM 53/113805 + ADM 53/114231
  12. ADM 53/113805
  13. ADM 53/113806 + ADM 199/408
  14. ADM 53/113806
  15. ADM 199/408
  16. ADM 53/113805 + ADM 199/408
  17. ADM 53/113806 + ADM 199/408 + report of proceedings of HMAS Parramatta
  18. ADM 53/113807 + ADM 199/408
  19. ADM 53/113807
  20. ADM 53/115496
  21. ADM 199/428 + ADM 199/2549
  22. ADM 53/115498
  23. ADM 53/115499
  24. ADM 53/115500
  25. ADM 53/115500 + ADM 199/428

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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