Allied Warships

ORP Sokol (N 97)

Submarine of the U class

NavyThe Polish Navy
TypeSubmarine
ClassU 
PennantN 97 
ModSecond Group 
Built byVickers Armstrong (Barrow-in-Furness, U.K.) 
Ordered4 Sep 1939 
Laid down9 Dec 1939 
Launched30 Sep 1940 
Commissioned28 Jan 1941 
End service3 Aug 1946 
History

HMS Urchin was loaned to the Polish Navy on 11 January 1941. She was commissioned as ORP Sokol (Falcon) on 28 January 1941.

She was returned to the Royal Navy on 3 August 1946. She was scrapped in 1949.

 
Former nameHMS Urchin

Commands listed for ORP Sokol (N 97)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Kpt. mar. Borys Karnicki, ORP19 Jan 194123 Feb 1942
2Kpt. mar. Jerzy Karol Koziolkowski, ORP23 Feb 194217 Mar 1942
3Kpt. mar. Borys Karnicki, ORP17 Mar 194229 Jul 1942
4Kpt. mar. Jerzy Karol Koziolkowski, DSC, ORP29 Jul 194212 Dec 1944
5Kmdr ppor. Boleslaw Szymon Romanowski, DSC, ORP12 Dec 19447 Feb 1945
6Por. Mar. Tadeusz Bernas, ORP7 Feb 194517 Jun 1945
7Kmdr ppor. Boleslaw Szymon Romanowski, DSC, ORP17 Jun 194529 Sep 1945
8Kpt. Mar. Tadeusz Bernas, ORP29 Sep 19453 Aug 1946

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Notable events involving Sokol include:


27 Jan 1941
Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed her builders yard at Barrow for Holy Loch. She was escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr.(Retd.) C.C. Flemming, RN). (1)

28 Jan 1941
Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training.

Following succesful trials on this day she was accepted for service.

[Data for the trials and exercises during this period is taken from the logs of January and February 1941 from the depot ship HMS Titania.] (1)

29 Jan 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted trials and exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

30 Jan 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted trials and exercises in the Clyde area. (2)

31 Jan 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Holy Loch, [presumably] for the Arrochar torpedo range for torpedo discharge trials. (2)

4 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) returned to Holy Loch, [presumably] from the Arrochar torpedo range after torpedo discharge trials there. (3)

6 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area or at Campbeltown. (3)

8 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) returned to Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area or at Campbeltown. (3)

9 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

10 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

11 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

14 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

15 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

16 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) returend to Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

17 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (3)

18 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Holy Loch for Dundee. She was escorted by HMS White Bear (Cdr.(Retd.) C.C. Flemming, RN). (4)

20 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived at Dundee. (4)

22 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) proceeded from Dundee to Rosyth. She is to participate in A/S exercises in the Firth of Forth. (4)

28 Feb 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) is docked at Rosyth.

5 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) is undocked.

19 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) proceeded from Rosyth to Dundee.

23 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) and HMS Undaunted (Lt. J.L. Livesey, RN) escorted by HMS Leda (Cdr. R.C.V. Ross, DSO, RN), departed Dundee for Harwich. They were joined off Blyth by HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) and HMS Sunfish (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN). (1)

24 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki), HMS Undaunted (Lt. J.L. Livesey, RN), HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) and HMS Sunfish (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) arrived at Harwich. (1)

25 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki), HMS Undaunted (Lt. J.L. Livesey, RN), HMS Sealion (Cdr. B. Bryant, DSC, RN) and HMS Sunfish (Lt. G.R. Colvin, RN) departed Harwich for Portsmouth. They were escorted by HMS Sheldrake (Cdr.(Retd.) E.H. Hopkinson, RN). (1)

26 Mar 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived at Portsmouth. She departed for her 1st war patrol later the same day. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay about 250 to 300 miles west of Brest. (5)

15 Apr 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 1st war patrol, which had been mainly uneventful, at Portsmouth.

20 Apr 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) is docked at the Portsmouth Dockyard. [Date of undocking currently unknown to us.] (6)

7 May 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for her 2nd war patrol. Before proceeding on patrol a deep dive was made off Start Point to test the recent repairs to her pressure hull.

Sokol was again ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. (7)

24 May 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 2nd war patrol at Portsmouth. Once again the patrol had been mainly uneventful. A lot of fishing vessels had been sighted as well as a few enemy patrol vessels which were evaded. (8)

5 Jun 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for her 3rd war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. (8)

23 Jun 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 3rd war patrol at Portsmouth. Again the patrol had been uneventful, mainly fishing vessels and aircraft having been sighted. Visibility was also poor throughout that patrol. (8)

7 Jul 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for her 4th war patrol. Once again she was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. (8)

15 Jul 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) attacked the German passenger/cargo vessel Baudouinville (13761 GRT, built 1939, former Belgian) with four torpedoes west of Île d'Yeu, France. No hits were obtained.

(All times are zone A/-1)
0405 hours - Sighted a 10000 tons passenger/cargo vessel thought to the a supply ship at a range of 2500 yards. She was escorted by what were thought to be two destroyers. Started attack.

0424 hours - In position 46°41'N, 02°30'W fired four torpedoes from 1000 yards. No hits were obtained. No counter attack with depth charges followed though it was thought that single gunshots were heard at 0440 and 0445 hours. (8)

23 Jul 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 4th war patrol at Portsmouth. (8)

12 Aug 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for her 5th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol in the Bay of Biscay. Before proceeding on patrol exercises had been carried out. (8)

16 Aug 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) is ordered to proceed to position 45°30'N, 02°00'W to try to intercept an Italian submarine returning to Bordeaux. This italian submarine had been D/F'd while making an enemy report the day before.

The submarine in quistion was Benedetto Brin which appeared to have encountered HMS Parthian (Lt.Cdr. M.G. Rimington, DSO, RN) the previous day. (8)

26 Aug 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 5th war patrol at Portsmouth. (8)

2 Sep 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Portsmouth for Gibraltar. Sokol was to proceed to Malta to join the 10th Submarine Flotilla based there. (9)

15 Sep 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived at Gibraltar. (4)

19 Sep 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Gibraltar for her 6th war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean). Sokol was to patrol off Cape San Vito, Sicily to provide cover for convoy opertion Halberd. Upon completion of her patrol she was to proceed to Malta. (8)

25 Sep 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived in her patrol area. (8)

1 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 6th war patrol (1st in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

4 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 7th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to proceed to position 33°45'N, 12°46'E to search for the crew of a crashed RAF Blenheim bomber. (8)

6 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 7th war patrol (2nd in the Mediterranean) at Malta. Weather conditions had not been very good and they had been unable to locate the aircrew. The accuracy of the position ORP Sokol was to conduct the seach was questioned by the Commanding Officer of the 10th Submarine Flotilla, Capt. G.W.G. Simpson, RN. (8)

9 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 8th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol to the southward of Lampion Island to intercept an enemy convoy en-route to Tripoli from Naples.

The convoy Sokol was to intercept proceeded from Naples (departed 8 October) to Tripoli. It was made up of the transports Giulia (5921 GRT, built 1926), Casaregis (6485 GRT, built 1924), Zena (5219 GRT, built 1914), Bainsizza (7933 GRT, built 1930) and the tanker Proserpina (4870 GRT, built 1926). It was escorted by the destroyers Granatiere (Capt. Capponi), Fuciliere, Bersagliere and Alpino. Torpedo aircraft from Malta managed to attack the convoy twice and were able to sink the Zena and Casaregis. Bainsizza had to put into Trapani with engine trouble. (8)

11 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 8th war patrol (3rd in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

23 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 9th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Tyrrhenian Sea. (8)

27 Oct 1941
While operating south of Naples, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki), tried to attack a merchant vessel of about 3000 tons. When about to fire torpedoes the merchant vessel disappeared behind some rocks close to the shore so reluctantly the attack had to be broken off.

(All times are zone A/-1).

0815 hours - Sighted a merchant vessel of 3000 tons very near to Cape Campenella. Enemy course 090°, bearing 320°, range 3 nautical miles. Started attack but the ship went through the rocks by the mainland so the attack had to be broken off. Remained patrolling by Bocca Picollo about 3 miles from the land but visibility was not good. Fog at times dense, and heavy rain. (8)

28 Oct 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) fired four torpedoes against the Italian armed merchant cruiser Città di Palermo (5413 GRT, built 1930) west Ischia Island, Italy in position 40°42'N, 13°47'E. The torpedoes missed their target.

(All times are zone A/-1)
1030 hours - Sighted a convoy made up of a liner and four cargo vessels. They were escorted by two destroyers. Started attack.

1048 hours - Fired four torpedoes from 6000 yards. Sokol broke surface shortly after firing. She remained at 10 feet for about 30 seconds.

1054 hours - One explosion was heard, this was thought to be a hit.

1100 hours - Sokol was now at 240 feet. 10 depth charges were dropped about 2 nautical miles astern. (8)

2 Nov 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) sank the Italian merchant vessel Balilla (2469 GRT, built 1920) about 20 nautical miles north-west of Capo San Vito, Sicily, Italy near position 38°22'N, 12°20'E. Balilla was en-route from Sousse, Tunisia to Palermo, Sicily.

(All times are zone -1)
0138 hours - In position 38°05'N, 12°03'E sighted one vessel 10 nautical miles north of Marittimo at a range of about 4 nautical miles. Enemy course was 070°.

0140 hours - Dived to hear the HE, 70 revs.

0145 hours - Surfaced and closed. The target was seen to be a 3000 ton merchant vessel.

0158 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 1000 yards. No hits.

0201 hours - Closed to 400 yards.

0203 hours - Fired another torpedo but it had a gyro failure. The ship was now stopped and being abandoned.

0204 hours - Closed the vessel even further. Fired 34 rounds. All were hits. The last 20 were fired from only 50 yards and aimed at the waterline.

0215 hours - Resumed course to return to Malta. (8)

3 Nov 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 9th war patrol (4th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

13 Nov 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 10th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off the west coast of Greece. Other submarines were also operating in the area on a patrol line Sokol was also to be part of so as to intercept enemy convoys to Benghazi. (8)

17 Nov 1941
At 0300B/17, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) received a signal timed 1731B/16 from Capt. S.1 ordering Sokol to patrol in position 38°01'N, 20°13'E. (8)

18 Nov 1941
Around 1600B/18, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) received a signal timed 1113B/18 from Capt. S.1 ordering Sokol to patrol off Navarino Bay. (8)

19 Nov 1941
At 0830 hours (zone B/-2), ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki), ran into the net defence of Navarino Bay while attempting to enter the bay to attack enemy ships inside it. She managed to break out of the net defence and retired to seaward having sustained some minor damage. (8)

21 Nov 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) attacked but missed the Italian destroyer Strale inside Navarino Bay. It was however thought the destroyer had been sunk as breaking up noises had been heard.

Later the same day she attacked an Italian convoy south-west of Sapientza Island but no hits were obtained. This convoy was made up of the merchant vessels Tinos (German, 2826 GRT, built 1914) and Bolsena (Italian, 2384 GRT, built 1918). It was escorted by the destroyer Strale and the torpedo boat Orione en route from Navarino to Benghazi.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1205 hours - Closed the entrance to Navarino Bay. Two destroyers were seen inside the bay, an Avieri (Soldati) class and a Spica class (torpedo boat). No merchant ships was seen from our position. Decided to attack the Avieri class destroyer.

1540 hours - Fired two torpedoes from 4000 yards.

1542 hours - Fired a third torpedo but it had a gyro failure and it ran across Sokol which was fortunately not hit.

1543 hours - Heard two torpedo explosions thought to be hits as further gurgling sounds and smaller explosions were heard on the Asdic. Sokol retired to the north-west.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2315 hours - In position 10 miles 270° Cape Sapienza sighted one destroyer and three merchant vessels in convoy at a range of about 4000 yards. Course south-west, estimated speed 10 knots. It was a very dark night and the convoy was invisible from time to time against the clouds on the horizon.

2320 hours - The convoy altered course to the south. Gave chase at full speed - but still trimmed down.

2335 hours - The convoy altered course to the south-west again. Range 6000 to 7000 yards.

2338 hours - Fired three torpedoes at 20 second interval on 125 degree track, point of aim was the leading ship of the convoy. Altered course 90 degrees after firing.

2340 hours - Dived for trim and reloading.

2345 hours - Heard two loud explosions at 3 seconds interval followed by a grating or grinding noise (heard only on the Asdic) for 2 minutes. (8)

27 Nov 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 10th war patrol (5th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

12 Dec 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 11th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to to patrol in the Ionian Sea in a patrol line with HMS Upholder (Lt.Cdr. M.D. Wanklyn, DSO, RN), HMS P 31 (Lt. J.B.de B. Kershaw, RN) and HMS P 34 (Lt. P.R.H. Harrison, DSC, RN). Sokol was to proceed to position 37°21'N, 19°22'E which was the easternmost position of the patrol line. (8)

15 Dec 1941
At 0030B/15, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) set course to proceed to the northward. The patrol line being disbanded. (8)

16 Dec 1941
At dawn on the 16th, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) was off the Gulf of Taranto in position 39°24'N, 18°13'E with HMS Unbeaten (Lt. Cdr. E.A. Woodward, RN) and HMS P 31 (Lt. J.B.de B. Kershaw, RN) bearing 220° 12 miles and 24 miles respectively from ORP Sokol. (8)

19 Dec 1941
During the 18th the patrol line was changed slightly by Capt. S.10.

At 0930B/19, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) heard HMS Unbeaten (Lt. Cdr. E.A. Woodward, RN), still in the central billet of the patrol line) calling both HMS P 31 (Lt. J.B.de B. Kershaw, RN) and ORP Sokol on SS/T. Sokol's Asdic transmission failed, which was very unfortunate, since their relative positions could not be checked. HMS Unbeaten was 240° from ORP Sokol at this time.

At 1100B/19, visibility became bad with slight rain. By 1135B/19 a heavy rain storm had developed on a calm sea and the resultant noise on the sea surface made Asdic ineffective. At 1150B/19, the rain storm had deceased and HE could be heard on a bearing 220°. At noon, with Sokol in approximate position 39°14'N, 17°49'E, the enemy fleet was sighted bearing 235° comprising two battleships in line ahead, two cruisers also in line ahead disposed to starboard of the battleships and ten destroyers escorting them. Also ten aircraft were patrolling overhead. The range to the nearest line of cruisers was 10000 yards. Enemy's course was 295°, speed 20 knots. At 1215B/19 the enemy fleet altered course to the northward and disappeared.

These heavy ships passed between ORP Sokol and HMS Unbeaten which latter gives his noon position as 39°13'N, 17°42'E. HMS Unbeaten had sighted smoke at this time bearing 040°. Unfortunately at this time the rain storm complained of by ORP Sokol had moved over HMS Unbeaten and the enemy's alteration to northward at 1215B/19 must have taken him between the two submarines out of range of both.

Weather had been poor and cloudy for two day. Submarines were out of sight of land and the enemy fleet passed through the submarine patrol line in the midst of a rain storm and it was this last misfortune which prevented either submarine attacking.

The enemy fleet sighted by ORP Sokol was made up of the battleships Littorio, Andrea Doria, Guilio Cesare, heavy cruisers Gorizia, Trento and the destroyers Granatiere, Bersagliere, Fuciliere, Alpino, Corazziere, Carabiniere, Antoniotto Usodimare, Maestrale, Alfredo Oriani and Vincenzo Gioberti. (8)

20 Dec 1941
At 0001B/20, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed her patrol area to return to Malta via Punta Stilo. (8)

23 Dec 1941
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 11th war patrol (6th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

4 Jan 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 12th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Taranto in a patrol line together with HMS Unbeaten (Lt.Cdr. E.A. Woodward, RN) and HMS Thrasher (Lt. H.S. Mackenzie, RN).

Later ORP Sokol patrolled off the coast of Calabria in the area near Crotone. (8)

16 Jan 1942
At 0130B/16, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) arrived in position 40°07'N, 17°17'E to patrol in that area as ordered by Capt. S.10 in a signal received on 13 January. (8)

20 Jan 1942
At 0001B/20, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) left patrol to return to Malta. (8)

21 Jan 1942
At 1330B/21, in position 36°41'N, 16°07'E, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki), heard HE of 160 rpm bearing 140°. Nothing was seen, but as the sea was rough, an attempt was made to come to 20 feet to have another look, and Sokol broke surface. A periscope and jumping wire was seen bearing 110° at 2000 yards. Altered course towards it, but it disappeared and no further HE was heard.

The closest submarine at this moment was the British HMS Unique (Lt. A.F. Collett, RN) but she reported nothing at this time. (8)

22 Jan 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 12th war patrol (7th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

6 Feb 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) departed Malta for her 13th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol east of Tunisia. (8)

12 Feb 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) sank the Italian auxiliary patrol vessel Giuseppina (392 GRT) with gunfire about 30 nautical miles south of Sfax, Tunisia in position 34°15'N, 10°55'E.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1620 hours - Sighted three masts of a sailing vessel bearing 230°. Range was 3 nautical miles. Enemy course 340°. The schooner was within French territorial waters.

1721 hours - The schooner stopped and displayed navigation lights. She was still within French territorial waters.

1746 hours - The schooner switched off her navigation lights and got underway again.

1925 hours - Surfaced. Full speed ahead to intercept. Range to the schooner was about 6 nautical miles.

2020 hours - Went to action stations.

2100 hours - Fired 3 rounds at the schooner from 300 yards, 2 hits were obtained. The schooner stopped at once and the crew abandoned ship.

2115 hours - Sent over a boarding party. They took off a whole bunch of papers. Two holds were found loaded with coal.

2120 hours - The boarding party left the schooner having placed a demolition charge.

2115 hours - A terrific explosion blew the stern of the schooner. Position was 34°15'N, 10°55'E. Sokol then cleared the area. (8)

14 Feb 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) attacked an Italian destroyer or torpedo boat with three torpedoes north of Zuara, Libya. No hits were obtained.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0115 hours - In position 33°18'N, 12°00'E a silhoutte was sighted bearing 230°, range 3 nautical miles.

0152 hours - Started attack. The target was probably a destroyer.

0157 hours - Fired a salvo of three torpedoes from 2000 / 2500 yards. The third torpedo had a gyro failure and ran 45° to starboard. No hits were obtained. The target continued on its way and the attack appeared no to have been noticed. (8)

19 Feb 1942
At 2030B/19, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) left patrol to return to Malta. (8)

20 Feb 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) ended her 13th war patrol (8th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

3 Mar 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski) departed Malta for her 14th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in an area between Pantelleria and Lampedusa.

Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) Koziolkowski had temporary assumed command vice Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) Karnicki in ordered to gave the latter a rest. (8)

10 Mar 1942

A busy day today for ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski) off Pantellaria. Several attacks were started but none could be carried through. Capt. S.10, was of the opinion this type of A/S destroyers / torpedo boat was not to be attacked so close to their base, way to dangerous. Lt.Cdr. Koziolkowski should have retired from the area at 0835B/10 when two of these ships were sighted. Had he been further to the south he might have been able to close the merchant vessels and deliver a surprise attack.

0430B/10, Set course to the north-east closing Pantellaria. Intending to intercept ships mentioned in S.10's 1810B/9 when off Pantellaria.

0640B/10, Dived three miles off focal point west of Pantellaria.

0752B/10, Heard HE, first by hydrophones, then close enough to hear it directly. Then the HE suddenly stopped. A destroyer / torpedo boat was first visible in the twilight abeam to port. A background of cliffs made it extremely difficult to see the destroyer / torpedo boat, which appeared to be of the Spica-class. Range 1000 yards. Turned to attack. The destroyer / torpedo boat got underway steamed to the north-west.

0835B/10, Two Spica-class destroyers / torpedo boats appeared from the shadows of the west side of Pantellaria. Stopping intermittently. Range two miles from the submarine bearing north. Turned northward in order to attack.

0840B/10, Sighted an unidentified aircraft. Range 1500 yards. Height 100 feet, flying straight towards Sokol. Went deep. Pinging was heard through the hydrophones. Impossible to locate its direction due to our defective Asdic. Pinging was then heard every three seconds, and every thirty seconds an audible ping was heard very loudly.

0850B/10, Returned to periscope depth. Nothing visible. Very misty all round. Faint HE was still heard.

0910B/10, HE and pinging cleared.

0920B/10, Three aircraft were seen making a broad sweep. Six tapping explosions were heard from their direction. Between then and 1000B/10, pinging was heard every three seconds.

0950B/10, Heard four tapping explosions.

1020B/10, Heard four tapping explosions.

1030B/10, Heard three tapping explosions. All were thought to have been between two to five miles distant. Visibility was reduced to two miles by fog. Owing to the Asdic defect, it was impossible to ascertain whether pinging or tapping came from the shore (distant about six miles) or from hunting craft. Withdrew slowly to the southward.

1120B/10, Visibility now improved to westward - up to ten miles.

1200B/10 to 1230B/10, Eighteen tapping explosions were heard at irregular intervals.

1300B/10, Set course 350° to return closer to the focal point.

1315B/10, Seven tapping explosions were heard distinctly to starboard followed by HE which disappeared after five minutes.

1330B/10, A merchant vessel was sighted bearing 120°, range was over 10000 yards. Very broad on the port bow. Shortly after it disappeared into the mist. Proceeding to attack.

1335B/10, The merchant vessel was seen agains as was a destroyer of the Navigatori-class. The merchant vessel was thought to be of 6000 tons. One aircraft was seen steering 030°.

1345B/10, The target was seen to zig towards, now steering 005°. Range 9500 yards. Set course to 055° to approach.

1355B/10, Target zigged towards again. Now steering 335°. Range 6000 yards. Three aircraft were seen escorting the target. One ahead one on each beam. They were patrolling the area about two to three miles around the target.

1357B/10, When almost ready to fire torpedoes decided not to do so. The sea was nearly flat calm so the torpedo tracks could be quickly sighted by patrolling aircraft and the target would have ample time to avoid the torpedoes.

1358B/10, The target zigged away. Now stearing 010°. No HE was heard on the hydrophones during the attack at the above ranges.

1400B/10, Went deep and set course to the south to patrol there.

1415B/10, Heard HE close by.

1420B/10, Returned to periscope depth. Sighted a Spica-class destroyer / torpedo boat on the port beam, range 1500 yards. The enemy was proceeding north, speed about 18 knots. Too late and too close to turn for attack. Withdrew to the south-west.

1435B/10, The same destroyer / torpedo boat was now patrolling astern to the north-east. Aircraft were seen close above the enemy, obviously patrolling together.

1500B/10, One aircraft, range 500 yards, height 150 feet, flying straight overhead. Went deep.

1530B/10, One aircraft, range 1000 yards, height 50 feet. Went deep again. The sea was very calm. The mist was disappearing being replaced by bright sunlight.

1540B/10, Heard faint HE. Three tapping explosions. Rather close. Nothing in sight except one aircraft at 3000 yards. It would appear the tapping noises came from aircraft bombs.

1545B/10, From now until 1630B/10, aircraft bombs were dropped at intervals of a few minutes all over the place.

1645B/10, Sighted a merchant vessel bearing 150°. Range was over 10000 yards. Enemy course 030°. Commenced to approach at high speed, 60° to the target's course.

1709B/10, The target zigged towards. Steering 000°, range now 5600 yards. Sighted two escorting aircraft circling the target. Altered course to 050° and gave chase.

1714B/10, Target zigged away steering 042° range still 5600 yards. Now three escorting aircraft were seen. One aircraft was coming straight towards. Went deep and gave chase on a nearly parallel course, hoping that the next zig would be towards. Two tapping bombs exploded close by.

1724B/10, Returned to periscope depth. Two aircraft were circling above the submarine and dropping some bombs. One aircraft was seen flashing. Sighted an escorting destroyer of the Avieri-class at a range of 3000 yards. Merchant vessel's course was now 340°, range 3800 yards. Turned towards to shorten the attack and fire on a finer track.

1727B/10, The target turned away 130° on her bow, steering 025°. The destroyer turned towards. Heard a burst of speed on the hydrophones. A small splash from an aircraft bomb was seen 30 yards from the periscope. Went deep at full speed.

1730B/10, Four depth charges were dropped close to port. Withdrew to the south-west at full speed. Depth was now 200 feet. Until 1736B/10, One depth charge was dropped every minute.

1739B/10, Took advantage of an interval in the depth charging to slow down and alter course to the westward.

1747B/10, Four depth charges were dropped astern between now and 1755B/10.

1801B/10, Three depth charges were dropped close astern. Gave a burst of speed and turned southwards.

1814B/10, One depth charges was dropped. It appeared that two ships were now hunting above as HE was heard from a direction other than that of the explosion.

1826B/10, One depth charge was dropped. Heard no HE.

1841B/10, Three depth charges close astern. Gave a burst of speed.

1855B/10, Seven depth charges were dropped at increasing distance until 1930B/10.

1930B/10, Returned to periscope depth. Nothing in sight in the disk. Heard depth charges being dropped at long intervals in the distance.

2100B/10, Surfaced and proceeded to the south. (8)

12 Mar 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski) sighted a tug towing two barges proceeding south from Pantellaria. Intention was to engage them after dark but by then contact was lost and the tug could not be found during the search that was conducted.

1325B/12, Sighted a funnel and two high masts as if appearing from behind the east side of Pantellaria. Range about 5 nautical miles, fine on the bow. Steering 210°. Suspected it to be an A/S vessel. Withdrew to the south-west.

1340B/12, The vessel appeared to be a tug with two gunnery targets on a long tow. Steering south at a speed of 5 knots.

1400B/12, Position was now 36°35'N, 11°56'E.

1420B/12, Closed to examine and found the targets to be two large barges or pontoons laden with large cans on deck, obviously camouflaged as they had the appearance of lattice work. As it was impossible to attack by gunfire due to the strong aircraft activity being only 15 miles of Pantellaria set course to follow the tug and chased at 300 revolutions at 90 feet, going up to periscope depth at half an hour intervals.

1900B/12, The tug altered course 20°. The range was now about 8 miles. But it was soon impossible to find her in the coming dusk.

1945B/12, When ready to surface heard HE on hydrophones. It was too dark to sea antyhing through the periscope so had to remain down.

2005B/12, Surfaced and proceeded to the southwards at high speed.

2300B/12, Arrived in the estimated position of the tug. It was a dark misty night. Visibility between 1 and 3 miles. Commenced sweeping the area.

2340B/12, Saw smoke to the north. Set course towards it. The smoke vanished after 10 minutes and nothing was sighted after covering 5 miles. The battery was too low to give further chase at speed so turned south to continue sweeping towards Lampion and charge the batteries as well. Sighted nothing further.

0215B/13, Ceased searching and commenced to patrol the route between Lampion and Pantellaria. (8)

14 Mar 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski) tried to attack / capture a 2-masted schooner near Lampedusa. The attempt however failed.

1900B/14, Sighted a 2-masted schooner about 300 ton, bearing 320°, steering south at 2 knots under sail. Two aircraft were apparently escorting the schooner so unable to attack now. Position was 35°41'N, 12°38'E.

1930B/14, Eight aircraft bombs were dropped thought to be eight miles away.

2000B/14, Surfaced and waited on the estimated course of the target. It was a dark misty night visibility was about 2 miles. Nothing was seen or heard up to 2200B/14 at which time the target should have reached Lampedusa. [The patrol report says Pantellaria, but this must be a mistake.]

0400B/15, Abandoned the search and set course to return to Malta.

1050B/15, Sighted a 2-masted schooner, which looked like the same one as sighted yesterday, bearing 270°, range 2 miles. Position was 10 miles north of Lampedusa. Weather conditions; slight fog, visibility 3 miles, calm sea. The schooner was under sail steering south at 2 knots. Set course to approach and surface close by the schooner to try to capture her and bring her to Malta.

1115B/15, Periscope depth. The schooner was seen to turn away to 220°, with sails still set. Continued to chase.

1140B/15, Periscope depth. The schooner had increased the range to 3 miles, sails down and proceeding on the motor, speed about 6 knots. Capturing her without compromising out position had become impossible. Surfaced and approached to attack with gunfire. Found the weather conditions considerable improved and now being only 5 miles from the coast, considered it unwise to press home the attack which would have taken Sokol within 2 miles from the coast. Gave up and dived. (8)

16 Mar 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski) ended her 14th war patrol (9th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

26 Mar 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) was near-missed during an air raid on Malta. (10)

1 Apr 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki) is damaged during an air raid on Malta. (10)

17 Apr 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) departed Malta for Gibraltar where she was to be repaired. During the passage only the port propeller could be used due to damage to the starboard one. (8)

28 Apr 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) arrived at Gibraltar for repairs. (8)

18 Jun 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) conducted DG trials off Gibraltar. (11)

21 Jun 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) departed Gibraltar for Holy Loch. During her repairs at Gibraltar it had been decided to sent Sokol back to the U.K. for a full refit. (10)

25 Jun 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) is diverted to patrol off Ferrol to intercept a damaged U-boat which had arrived there with damage, this was U-105. (10)

30 Jun 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) is ordered to continue her passage to the U.K. The German U-boat U-105 had departed from Ferrol on 28 June. (10)

9 Jul 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) arrived at Holy Loch. During the passage north through the Irish Sea she had been escorted by HrMs Jan van Gelder (Lt. P.L.M. van Geen, RNN). (10)

12 Jul 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) departed Holy Loch for Blyth. She was escorted by HrMs Jan van Gelder (Lt. P.L.M. van Geen, RNN) all the way. (10)

15 Jul 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) arrived at Blyth where she was to refit. (10)

18 Jul 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) B. Karnicki, DSO) was taken in hand for refit at Blyth. (4)

20 Nov 1942
With her refit completed, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), departed Blyth for Dundee. (10)

21 Nov 1942
Off Dundee, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), was joined by the Dutch submarine HrMs O 14 (Lt.Cdr. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN) for onward passage to Holy Loch. They were escorted by the British A/S trawler HMS Preston North End (Lt. K.A. Vasey, MBE, RNR). On the 23th the British AS trawler HMS Quadrille (T/Lt. N.T. Chetwood, RNVR) took over the escort. (10)

24 Nov 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch to begin a period of trials and training.

[Data for the trials and exercises during this period is taken from the logs of November and December 1942 from the depot ship HMS Forth.] (10)

25 Nov 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area. (12)

26 Nov 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area. (12)

1 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

2 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area or at Campbeltown. (13)

4 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area or at Campbeltown. (13)

5 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

6 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

9 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) [apparently] conducted exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

10 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Holy Loch [presumably] for exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

11 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch [presumably] from exercises in the Clyde area. (13)

13 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed from Holy Loch for Lerwick. Passage north towards Lerwick was made together with HMS Torbay (Lt. R.J. Clutterbuck, RN) and HMS P 339 (Lt.Cdr. M.R.G. Wingfield, DSO, RN). They were escorted by HMS Cape Palliser (Lt. B.T. Wortley, RNR). (8)

15 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Lerwick. The submarine arrived at Lerwick with a delay of 10 hours due to bad weather. After two hours at anchor in port the anchor was lost and Sokol grounded but sustained no damage. She then left Lerwick to ride out the gale outside the harbour. (8)

16 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) re-entered Lerwick harbour for fuel, provisions and patrol orders. She departed Lerwick at 1100 hours for her 15th war patrol. She was to provide cover for convoy operations to and from Northern Russia. (8)

26 Dec 1942
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area to return to Lerwick. (8)

2 Jan 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 15th war patrol at Lerwick. She departed for Dundee later the same day. She made the passage together with HrMs O 14 (Lt.Cdr. H.A.W. Goossens, RNN). They were escorted by HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. K.W. Richardson, RNR). (8)

4 Jan 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Dundee. (8)

22 Jan 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Dundee for Lerwick. She made the passage together with FFS Junon (Cdr. J. Querville, RN). They were escorted by HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. K.W. Richardson, RNR). (8)

24 Jan 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Lerwick. She departed Lerwick later the same day for her 16th war patrol. She was ordered to patrol off Bredsund, Norway. (8)

26 Jan 1943
At 0001A/26, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived in her patrol area (62°40'N, 05°23'E).

At 2130A/26, ORP Sokol is ordered to leave patrol and proceed to patrol off Northern Norway, Lopphavet area. (8)

30 Jan 1943
In the morning, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived in her new patrol area. (8)

3 Feb 1943
At 1830A/3, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area to return to Lerwick. (8)

6 Feb 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sustained some water damage to some equipment in the control room. In very heavy weather water had entered the control room through the conning tower hatch. In the end speed had to be reduced and the conning tower hatch was closed while proceeding on the surface. (8)

8 Feb 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 16th war patrol at Lerwick.

Later the same day she departed Lerwick for Dundee. She made the passage together with HMS P 224 (Lt. J.R. Drummond, DSC, RN), HrMs O 15 (Lt. A.J. Schouwenaar, RNN) and FFS Junon (Cdr. J. Querville, RN). They were escorted by HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. K.W. Richardson, RNR). (8)

10 Feb 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Dundee. She was then taken in hand for defects. (8)

18 Mar 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Dundee for Holy Loch. She was escorted by HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. K.W. Richardson, RNR) until about Scapa Flow when HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR) took over the escort. (14)

21 Mar 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Holy Loch. (4)

22 Mar 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Holy Loch for Gibraltar. Passage south through the Irish Sea was made together with HMS Uproar (Lt. L.E. Herrick, DSC, RN). They were escorted during the passage south through the Irish Sea by HMS La Capricieuse (Lt.Cdr. G.W. Dobson, RNR).

ORP Sokol and HMS Uproar parted company with HMS La Capricieuse at 1800A/24.

En-route she was ordered to intercept an outbound German blockade runner making this passage her 17th war patrol. (8)

29 Mar 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) is ordered to patrol within 40 miles from position 44°42'N, 12°24'W. (8)

31 Mar 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) is ordered to continue her passage to Gibraltar. (15)

7 Apr 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 17th war patrol at Gibraltar. (8)

15 Apr 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Gibraltar for her 18th war patrol (10th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Gulf of Lyons. (8)

28 Apr 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 18th war patrol (10th in the Mediterranean) at Algiers. The patrol had been uneventful. (8)

5 May 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Algiers for Malta. (8)

6 May 1943
At 0019A/6, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), sighted three torpedoes tracks at a range of 1000 yards in position 37°28'N, 03°56'E. The Officer of the Watch, S.Lt. Fritz, promptly turned away and none of the torpedoes hit.

[We have been unable to find an Axis submarine making an attack in this position at this time, possible it were porpoises which were sighted.] (8)

12 May 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Malta. (8)

31 May 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for her 19th war patrol (11th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off the east coast of Calabria.

2 Jun 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived in her patrol area. (8)

8 Jun 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) missed the Italian schooner Papa Michele (182 GRT) with two torpedoes off Companello, Calabria, Italia.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1050 hours - Sighted a schooner under sail coming from the direction of Punta Stilo. Range was 7000 yards.

1215 hours - In position 38°45'N 16°35'E fired two torpedoes from 120 yards. No hits were obtained, most likely the torpedoes ran under. The target was seen turning away and closed the coast.

10 Jun 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area to return to Malta. (8)

12 Jun 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 19th war patrol (11th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

1 Jul 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for her 20th war patrol (12th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol north of the Straits of Messina. (8)

6 Jul 1943
At 0200B/6, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), passed between Stromboli and Panarea Islands, arriving in her patrol area (8)

10 Jul 1943
At 0555B/10, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), which was patrolling at periscope depth sighted the conning tower of what is thought to be an Italian submarine at long range. Later it was thought HE of a second submarine was heard on a different bearing but this suspected second submarine was not sighted. ORP Sokol tried to close the range but an attack was not possible. (8)

15 Jul 1943
At 1700B/15, ORP Sokol Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), departed her patrol area to proceed to Bizerta. (8)

19 Jul 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Bizerta from patrol. (8)

23 Jul 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Bizerta for Malta. She made the passage together with HMS Unruly (Lt. J.P. Fyfe, RN) and HMS Ultor (Lt. G.E. Hunt, DSC, RN). They were escorted by HMS Bude (Lt. F.A.J. Andrew, RN) and HMS Clacton (A/Lt.Cdr.(Retd.) L.S. Shaw, RNR). (8)

24 Jul 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 20th war patrol (12th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

11 Aug 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for her 21st war patrol (13th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Bari, Italy. (8)

14 Aug 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered the Adriatic passing the Otranto Striats northbound while submerged. (8)

15 Aug 1943
Early in the evening, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), sighted smoke from an enemy convoy in position 41°15'N, 17°16'E. She closed to attack but before she could do so the convoy was attacked by ORP Dzik. A hunt by Italian A/S vessels was now started and Sokol unfortunately was on the receiving end and she was hunted and depth charged for almost the whole evening.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1820 hours - When in position 41°15'N, 17°16'E sighted smoke on bearing 130°, moving from coast to seaward, range 15 miles.

1915 hours - More smoke followed on course 050° until the reached the distance 10 miles off shore and then altered course to 300°. Two aircraft were seen at intervals, apparently patrolling continuously around the smoke. Set course 130° to close. The target was comparatively slow and it was estimated that close contact could not be reached before sunset. It was found however preferable to attack after dark from submerged at close range, being right ahead of the convoy. Smoke was approaching on steady bearing. It was nearly full moon and the convoy was in most favourable position to be against the moon.

2000 hours - As the sun set it appeared that there would be no moon as she just happened to be eclipsed.

2015 hours - The night was very dark, smoke was now faintly seen at range of about 3 miles.

2020 hours - Silhouettes of two torpedo boats were sighted in the sunset glow, on bearing 335°, steering 130°, range 3 miles. The course was altered to the south-south-west, to let them pass farther away.

2030 hours - The torpedo boats closed to about 3000 yards when they reduced speed apparently listening. Three faint explosions were heard which were thought to be echo-finding charges (this was actually Dzik attacking). Flashing was observed between the torpedo boats immediately afterwards and they moved with speed, coming straight on. It was nearly pitch dark now. Went deep, shutting off for depth charging, which resulted immediately. Torpedo boats commenced hunting, using Asdic on 16 Kcs, pinging was heard at 4 second intervals.

2125 hours - Hunting finished, no HE or A/S transmissions were heard. 22 Depth charges had been dropped altogether. This was all rather puzzling, it was inexplicable at the moment how a submerges submarine could be detected in the night as no A/S transmissions were heard before depth charging.

2220 hours - After withdrawing to the north-eastward for one hour, surfaced. The moon was coming up again. Sighted two silhouttes in line, beam on, range 4 miles bearing 200°. On bearing 225°, thin smoke was visible coming from Bari. Commenced closing slowly.

2223 hours - Set course 215°, closing at 200 revs. One of the silhouttes, now recognised as a torpedo boat, moved with speed, and three depth charges were dropped at intervals. There was no doubt that the torpedo boat was dropping depth charges, as the submarine was shaken after explosions. Obviously blowing the main ballast tanks must have been heard by listening torpedo boats. At the same moment smoke raised from the unseen silhouette between the torpedo boats. Continued closing, as the torpedo boat did not approach to more than 4000 yards, patrolling with wild alterations of course.

2250 hours - The moon was now bright, two torpedo boats were seen patrolling at a range of 3 to 4 miles, while the smoke was visibly opering range, steering 210°, thus coming close to the coast. Thin smoke, coming from Bari, was recognised as a patrol vessel or minesweeper.

2335 hours - Lost contact due to mist against the coast and withdrew to north-eastwards.

0200 hours (16th) - Completed charging and returned to the ' meeting place '. Northing could be seen. (8)

18 Aug 1943
In the afternoon, while patrolling close to the Bari harbour entrance, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), had to brake off an attack on an enemy convoy when she was forced deep by one of the escorts. It appeared Sokol was detected but no depth charging followed.

(All times are zone B/-2)

1406 hours - Sighted the mast and funnel of a torpedo boat, bearing 030°. She was steering 140°, towards the end of the swept channel.

1420 hours - Sighted a two-funnelled destroyer followed by one merchant vessel, steering south. Went to action stations. Our own course was 060°, 3000 yards off the swept channel.

1425 hours - The target arrived at the end of the channel and altered course to 240°. The escorting destroyers / torpedo boats having taken position 1500 yards on both quarters. Two aircraft were patrolling around, besides an aircraft sweeping the channel. The target was a passenger ship, 4000 tons, thought to be Calitea [Note: this ship had been sunk on 11 December 1941 by HMS Talisman] . A coaster, which was laying in the channel, hoisted a one-flag signal and proceeded to meet the convoy, taking position astern. Both the target and the destroyers / torpedo boats were proceeding at 14 knots on a steady course. It was intended to fire torpedoes some 1000 yards on some 110 - 130 degree track, after passing the starboard wing destroyer / torpedo boat.

1440 hours - Targets now bearing 090°, range 5000 yards. Altered course to 175°.

1447 hours - Went deep being now 1500 yards ahead of the starboard wing destroyer / torpedo boat.

1449 hours - The destroyer / torpedo boat passed overhead.

1450 hours - When coming up to periscope depth the submarine was found heavy and while altering trim depth control was lost and Sokol came up to 17 feet for a few seconds. Control was immediately regained, but when coming to periscope depth, the following situation was observed. The target was on relative bearing Red 050° thus still wanting 30° for D.A. to come. An aircraft was seen circling nearly overhead. The closest escort was seen 800 yards on the starboard beam, turning towards. It was believed we had been sighted breaking the surface. Went deep and shut off for depth charge attack.

1453 hours - No attack resulted and also no HE of the approaching escort was heard. Altered course to 195° to fire on a broad track and came to periscope depth. When the periscope was just emerging from the water, the destroyer was seen on relative bearing Green 030° at 200 yards, being 40° on the Port bow. She had two signals hoisted. Two aircraft were seen now, circling nearly above. The target was not seen at the moment. Went deep and broke off the attack.

1505 hours - Came to periscope depth. The target was nearing the harbour, being now 145° on the bow, range 5000 yards. The destroyer which interfered during the attack was seen now to part company with the convoy and was seen proceeding seawards up the channel. Only two aircraft were searching in close vicinity for an hour and a half. It was now considered that Sokol might not have been sighted after all so kept patrolling in the area.

(8)

22 Aug 1943
While passing the Otranto Straits, at 0136B/22, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), sighted what is thought to be a U-boat abaft the port beam. Range was below 1000 yards. Sokol tried to get into an attack position for a gun attack but failed to do so. At 0137 hours Sokol dived but the U-boat could not be seen through the periscope. When Sokol surfaced at 0150 hours the U-boat was sighted again and Sokol set off in pursuit only to be forced to dive again four minutes later when three E-boats were seen to be approaching.

[We have been unable to find any axis submarine in this area exiting the Adriatic. The only submarine we can think off in the area might have been HMS Unseen which was proceeding from Malta to the Adriatic.]

(All times are zone B/-2)
0100 hours - Sighted a small silhouette against the moon. Closed on the surface and made it out to be a small three-masted schooner on course 255° from Valona Bay.

0112 hours - Dived 3000 yards ahead of the schooner.

0132 hours - Surfaced 1000 yards astern of the schooner and started to close to sink her with gunfire.

0136 hours - Sighted a U-boat abaft the port beam, coming straight on and turning to a firing course. Range was below 1000 yards. Immediately put the helm to starboard as it seemed to dangerous to turn to port, thus increasing the enemy's chance, as she might be firing already. It was hoped to make a full swing to starboard and turn bows on the enemy, the gun being ready for use. Unfortunately the U-boat altered course towards, and when having her astern, she was now bows on.

0137 hours - Recalled the gun's crew and dived. Nothing could be seen through the periscope. No HE heard on Asdic or hydrophones, the sea being dead calm.

0150 hours - Surfaced. Sighted the U-boat on bearing 208° at a range of 4000 yards, steering 250°. Commenced chase on course 275°.

0154 hours - Sighted three E-boats in line abreast coming straight towards bearing 180°, range 2 miles, plainly visible by naked eye. Dived and went deep. (8)

25 Aug 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 21st war patrol (13th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

6 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for her 22nd war patrol (14th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol off Brindisi, Italy. (8)

8 Sep 1943
Around 1400B/8, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered the Adriatic.

Around 1930B/8, ORP Sokol received a signal ordering her to return to Malta. Course was set accordingly. (8)

9 Sep 1943

Around 0400B/9, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) received a signal ordering cancelling her recall. Course was set to proceed to the patrol area off Brindisi.

Around 1400B/9, ORP Sokol again entered the Adriatic, on the surface. (8)

10 Sep 1943
At 0100B/10, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived off Brindisi. Several ships were seen to enter the harbour during the day, including the light cruiser a Regolo-class cruiser.

In the evening a signal was sent to Capt. S 10 reporting the situation. (8)

11 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) intially remained off Brindisi to monitor the situation there.

She tried to make contact with the Italian Naval Officer in Command but to no avail.

(All times are zone B/-2)
At 0230B/11, she retired to seaward and dived when two motor torpedo boats were seen leaving the harbour. On surfacing at 0630B/11, she found dense fog all around.

At 1000B/11, the fog cleared and she approached the harbour again to try to contact the Italian Naval Officer in Command but again to no avail.

At 1050/11, she retired away from the harbour and dived to wait for any patrol vessel to leave the harbour and then stop that vessel to try to get into contact that way.

At 1220/11, an RD-class minesweeper was seen leaving the harbour. Sokol surfaced and commenced signalling, keeping the minesweeper at a range of 5000 yards at least, as her gun was manned and trained on Sokol. After half an hour closed for conservation as she had no signalling lamp however when Sokol closed to 300 yards the minesweeper retired to the harbour at full speed. Followed the minesweeper and closed to 2 miles off the harbour, calling the signal station again by 6" lamp, without any success.

At 1315B/11, a big hospital ship was sighted approaching Brindisi. Set course to intercept her. Stopped her and requisted a boat. Signals were passed quickly and a few minutes later a boat came alongside bringing an Italian Capitano di Fregatta onboard. The hospital ship was the Saturnia (23940 GRT, built 1927) and was coming from Venice with some thousands of troops onboard, including naval cadets. A (the) minesweeper closed Saturnia and disclosed that there were no Germans in Brindisi.

At 1435B/11, directed Saturnia to Taranto and sent Liaison Officer, T/A/Lt. G.G. Taylor, RNVR and two ratings onboard the minesweeper in ordered to find out the situation in Brindisi and to contact the Italian Naval Officer in Command concerning evacuation of merchant vessels.

At 1515B/11, reported the situation by signal to Capt. S. 10.

At 1530B/11, sighted the conning tower of a submarine below the horizon about 12 miles off shore on course 130°. Gave full chase, but could not close to more than 8000 yards, calling her by V/S all the time. As she was making some 14 knots and range was opening at 1555B/11, fired one round from the gun aiming 20° ahead of her bow. The submarine immediately answered by firing one round too, and altered course towards, replying now by V/S. Stopped her at 4000 yards and interrogated, then closed and came alongside. The submarine was the Vettor Pisani coming from Pola. Her Commanding Officer was an elderly Capitano di Fregatta. Put Sub.Lt. Fritz on board with two ratings on board and directed him to proceed to Taranto by the coastal route. Escorted him part of the way until 2220B/11 when off Santa Maria di Leuca. Sokol then set course to return to Brindisi.

At 2310B/11, when approaching Otranto, another submarine was sighted close to the shore. Closed to 1000 yards and then challenged. She appeared to be panic stricken, turning away, smoke screening herself and calling all hands on dock. It was obvious Sokol was not sighted before the Aldis lamp was switched on. She declared herself to be the Otaria coming from Pola with any knowledge of the recent situation. Having no more officers and men to spare for boarding party, as well as no more small arms, left her to go along to Taranto. ORP Sokol then continued her passage towards Brindisi. (8)

12 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) returned to the Brindisi area on this day.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0015B/12, transmitted a signal to Capt. S.10 giving a situation update.

0330B/12, When 10 miles south of Brindisi met a convoy of six merchant vessels going south. Recognised the 6000 tons tanker which was observed to enter Brindisi two days ago. Assumed this was the result of action taken T/A/Lt. Taylor sent ashore yesterday. Did not challenge the merchant vessels.

In the morning T/A/Lt. Taylor, RNVR and the two ratings came back from Brindisi. He had contacted the Italian Naval Officer in Command, who appeared to be very willing to so what he was told. He immediately gave orders for seven merchant vessels to prepare to leave Brindisi for Taranto and six of them left at midnight, unescorted, by the coastal route.

Taranto was chosen as nearest port in Allied hands, Italians being very unlikely to be persuaded to proceed to Malta unescorted. The harbour at Brindisi was packed with shipping and the intention was to clear it as soon as possibe.

There was one Regolo-class cruisers, the Scipione Africano, two destroyers and about eight corvettes in the harbour, for which the Italians insisted to be granted permission to stay in the harbour. One submarine found shelther in Brindisi, but she was now refitting and unseaworthy. During the day more merchant vessels entered Brindisi, as well as a number of all possible kind of small units, crowded with Italian soldiers escaping from Albania and Dalmatia. (8)

13 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) spent the day off Brindisi. Lt.Cdr. Koziolkowski paid a visit to the Italian admiral.

ORP Sokol departed the area to return to Malta at 2300B/13. (8)

16 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 22nd war patrol (14th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

26 Sep 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for her 23th war patrol (15th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the northern Adriatic. (8)

28 Sep 1943
At 0300B/28, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), entered the Adriatic. In the Otranto straits two destroyers were encountered. These were most likely Allied destroyers patrolling the Straits of Otranto.

(All times are zone B/-2)
At 0533B/28, Sokol dived to pass the Otranto Straits submerged.

At 1902B/28, HE was heard on Asdic, bearing 265°, just before it was intended to surface. It changed quickly to the south and steadied on bearing 170°. Asdic conditions were rather bad.

At 1933B/28, Sokol surfaced. No HE was heard on the surface. Radar picked up one echo ahead at 3000 yards, but was confused by several false echoes all round at distances between 1500 and 4000 yards.

At 1952B/28, radar distinquished two echoes from false ones on bearing 190°, 5000 yards and 7000 yards.

At 1956B/28, Sokol altered course to 220°. Radar echoes were lost.

At 2002B/28, two destroyers were sighted on bearing 180°. At the same moment radar picked up an echo at 7000 yards. Changed course to 315°. The destroyers passed on a northerly course without detecting the submarine. (8)

1 Oct 1943
At 0300B/1, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), arrived in her patrol area in the northern Adriatic. (8)

3 Oct 1943
While on patrol off Cape Promontore, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), sighted several vessels during the day but was unable to attack them. (8)

4 Oct 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) attacked two merchant vessels on this day, claiming to have sunk the first one. The ships attacked were the Gigliola (734 GRT, built 1908) and Sebenico (897 GRT, built 1922). Neither of these vessels were however sunk.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0732B/4, Sighted a big merchant vessel bearing 340°, range 8000 yards, fine on the starboard bow. Went to action stations and started attack. The target was thought to be a 5500 ton Italian vessel (under German flag) with a full deck cargo.

0745B/4, The target was stearing 148° on a steady course at an estimated speed of 11 knots.

0758B/4, In position, 44°47'N, 13°50'E fired two torpedoes of an intended salvo of four from 700 yards. Only two torpedoes were fired as trim was lost. When coming to periscope depth 35 seconds after firing the second torpedo, this was heard to explode being followed by a terrific explosion which shook the submarine to an unusual extend. Some lights went out and a few gauges were damaged.

0800B/4, Returned to periscope depth, the target was now on bearing 142°, range 600 yards, stopped, listing to starboard and trimmed bow down. All boats were being lowered to water level. No effect of damage could be seen while Sokol was astern of the target. Dark yellow smoke was seen above and flares were observed being fired.

It had been intended to fire another torpedo but given the stenght of the explosion it was thought that some ammution had exploded and with the current range it was not considered a good idea to fire another torpedo at the target proceeded to increase the range.

0825B/4, The target got underway, bow down, steering 165°. Commenced to chase at full speed proceeding on course 125° passing close to Periscolesa lighthouse.

0840B/4, The target was now bearing 165°. It altered course to 120° obviously rounding the cape. Range was now 2300 yards. It was obvious the merchant vessel, being crippled, feared the submarine might strike another blow, and got underway towards the shallows. It was obvious she was Fiume bound. ORP Sokol had problems with the strong current and at ....

0920B/4, The target was now seen on bearing 160° and was seen still proceeding on course 120° at 4 knots. Range was now 5500 yards. Altered course parallel to 120° and gave chase at full speed.

0947B/4, Range was now 4200 yards, gaining bearing 166°. The target altered course to 105°. Saw what is thought to be a pilot vessel at 1000 yards coming towards. Went deep. She passed close by at a speed of 15 knots.

1020B/4, The ' pilot vessel ' was now proceeding towards the crippled merchant vessel to which the range was now 6000 yards.

1025B/4, Breaking up noises were heard on Asdic followed by two faint explosions. Came to periscope depth. Only sighted the ' pilot vessel '. No sign of the crippled vessel.

1035B/4, Sighted another merchant vessel on bearing 267° steering 135° at a range of 9000 yards, 40° on the port bow. Set course 190° and gave full chase.

1050B/4, Recognised a small passenger ship of 2500 tons, armed with two guns, fore and aft, proceeding at 8 knots.

1102B/4, Fired two torpedoes from 2000 yards aimed at stem and stern.

1104B/4, One of the torpedoes developed a gyro failure, circling, passing over the submarine and eventually breaking surface. The other torpedo missed with the target altering course and firing with the stern gun at the torpedo running on the surface.

(8)

7 Oct 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) torpedoed and sank the Italian passenger vessel (in German service) Eridania (7095 GRT, built 1915) off Cape Promontore (today Cape Kamenjak in Croatia).

Later an attack, with the last remaining torpedo, on a passenger ships, thought to be the same one as in the second attack on 4 October, the Sebenico (897 GRT, built 1922), failed due to the torpedo being a circular runner. Shortly afterwards a second passenger vessel was sighted. Sokol surfaced and engaged with the gun damaging the Ugliano (164 GRT, built 1909).

(All times are zone B/-2)
0630B/7, Sighted smoke approaching from the north.

0635B/7, Sighted a medium size merchant vessel at a range of 8500 yards, 40° on the starboard bow. Went to action stations and commenced attack.

0710B/7, Fired three torpedoes from 600 yards. The second torpedo struck abaft the funnel, followed by a boiler explosion. The target disappeared in dark yellow smoke.

0718B/7, Closed to 400 yards. The target was sinking by the stern.

0722B/7, The vessel sank, leaving 5 boats or rafts. 21 Survivors were seen.

0730B/7, Commenced to withdraw to the southwards.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1407B/7, Sighted two masts and funnel bearing 165°. Gave full chase on course 240°.

1427B/7, Thought the vessel to be the same as the one attacked in the second attack on 4 October, a 2500 ton passenger vessel. Troops were seen on deck. Commenced attack.

1446B/7, Fired the last remaining torpedo from 2000 yards aimed at the funnel. The torpedo was heard on Asdic to be a circular runner. It was also seen to break surface through the periscope. The target took avoiding action.

1513B/7, Sighted another merchant vessel proceeding the same way as the one just attacked. It was a small passenger vessel of about 1500 tons, also with troops on board. She was armed with one small automatic gun forward. Prepared for gun action.

1600B/7, Surfaced 2300 yards abeam of the target giving full chase.

1603B/7, Opened fire. The target had increased speed and after five minutes she altered course 40° to bring her forward gun into action. She was also firing from two machine guns. All fire from the enemy was falling short. After closing to 1300 yards Sokol also opened fire with three Vickers machine guns. The enemy stopped firing after a while and turned stern on. Range was closing quickly now and the target appeared to be out of control.

1609B/7, The gun jammed and could not be cleared. At the same time an aircraft was sighted. Also a shore battery opened fire.

1610B/7, Dived and withdrew to the southward. 29 rounds of HE had been fired with the gun for 13 hits. Also 9 AA round were fired which all were seen to burst within 20-50 yards from the target. The effect of the AA shells was pretty devastating, shrapnel falling like hail and together with 700 rounds of Vickers machine guns fire must have produced a lot of confusion among the troops on board.

1820B/7, Surfaced and set course for Malta.

11 Oct 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 23th war patrol (15th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

15 Oct 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for Beirut. (4)

20 Oct 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Beirut. (4)

4 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Beirut for her 24th war patrol (16th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. (8)

6 Nov 1943
At 2145B/6, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered the Kaso Strait. (8)

7 Nov 1943
At 1240B/7, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered her patrol area between Amorgos and Anaphi. (8)

11 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sank the Greek sailing vessel Argentina (64 GRT) with gunfire off Amorgos, Greece.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1215B/11, Sighted a big two-masted schooner bearing 315° proceeding on her motor from Nio towards Amorgos. Range was 9 miles. Speed about 8 knots.

1250B/11, The schooner passed at 200 yards, beam on. She was of about 140 tons, fully rigged with topmasts and flying the German flag. The crew of more then a dozen were seen wearing naval uniforms.

1313B/11, Surfaced for gun action 4 miles off the south-west point of Amorgos. Range was 4000 yards. The schooner turned towards the coast and opened fire with two heavy machine guns. The 11th round hit the foremast and brought it down. The enemy ceased fire for a while and slowed down. After 24 rounds the gun jammed due to defective ammunition and a quick repair was not possible. The enemy immediately re-opened fire, apparently stopping as the range closed to 2000 yards. Fired 400 rounds from two Vickers machine guns.

1320B/11, Dived quickly as the enemy's gunfire was becoming unpleasantly hot. Examined the target through the periscope. She was stopped and adrift. Two small rowing boats were leaving and proceeding towards the shore but with only a few men, the others were still on board.

1347B/11, Fired one torpedo set to two feet from 500 yards. The torpedo turned slightly to port and it ran underneath the stern of the schooner. The result was panic on board the schooner and the remaining crew left in a hurry in a motor boat steering towards the coast. Closed to 200 yards and confirmed the schooner was really abandoned.

1406B/11, Surfaced. The schooner was boarded by S.Lt. Fritz and a four ratings. They quickly placed a demolition charge and returned on board Sokol as an aircraft was seen patrolling.

1435B/11, The schooner blew up in approximate position 36°45'N, 25°45'E. (8)

18 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sank the Greek sailing vessel SYR 370 / Taxiarchis (8 GRT) with gunfire north of Santorini Island, Greece.

In the evening HMS Sokol departed this patrol area to patrol off north-east Crete as ordered.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0820B/18, Sighted a 20 tons caique bearing 025° proceeding south from Nio to Santorini. Range was 6 miles. Enemy course 090°. Set course to intercept.

0840B/18, The caique was now 2000 yards away. She turned back and set course 340°. Surfaced for gun action when the range was 3000 yards. Fired across her bow. The fourth round was nearly a hit in the stern. The caique then turned towards and surrendered, waving white flags. Ceased fire and closed. There was no cargo on board. Four prisoners were taken on board, two, incredibly dirty Greeks and two Germans in uniform with machine guns, rifles, autimatics and hand granades. Then sank the caique with gunfire in approximate position 36°34'N, 25°23'E. (8)

19 Nov 1943
At 0955B/19, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), sank the Greek (in German service) sailing vessel KAL 89 / Agios Antonios (?? GRT) with a torpedo having damaged her first with gunfire.

Later, at 1249B/19, she sank two small sailing vessels with torpedoes (or the blast from exploding torpedoes).

And finally, at 1508B/19, the Greek (in German service) sailing vessel SAM 38 / Konstantinos (?? GRT) and the patrol vessel Mowe (40 GRT) were sunk by torpedoes.

All these sinkings were off the coast of north-east Crete.

Following these sinkings ORP Sokol left the area to return to Beirut. She entered the Kaso Strait at 2300B/19.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0600B/19, Arrived in the vicinity of Sitia Bay as ordered in Capt. S.1's signal 17/2345.

0730B/19, Sighted a 200 ton two-masted schooner full of troops, flying the German flag, bearing 105°. She was proceeding from the Yanisades Islands to mainland Crete. Closed to attack.

0903B/19, Surfaced for gun action at a range of 4000 yards. Obtained 8 hits setting the schooner on fire. Once again the gun jammed owing to defective ammuntion. Two shore batteries opened fire from about 4000 yards.

0912B/19, Dived.

0955B/19, Sunk the schooner by torpedo, while unloading troops ashore while the troops we being unloaded.

1005B/19, Proceeded to San Nikolo Bay where another 200 ton schooner was sighted.

1020B/19, The schooner was anchored close to the shore, fully loaded with troops.

1200B/19, After manoeuvring for an hour and a half to obtain a firing position. However the schooner, apparently aware of the submarine, manoeuvred on her motor to keep the bow on. During this period the schooner broke adrift at 1115 hours and drifted westwards. At 1140 hours three motor caiques arrived from the village in the bay and they towed the schooner to the south-west corner of the bay. At 1200 hours heard HE of a fast motor boat approaching from bearing 270°. Sighted an E-boat approaching from Mirabello Bay.

1225B/19, The E-boat secured alongside the schooner.

1230B/19, Commenced attack.

1249B/19, Fired two torpedoes from 1100 and 900 yards set to run on the surface. Both missed the main target. Two of the small caiques were sunk. Sokol struck the bottom at 30 feet and then broke surface to clear the shallows. Remained on the surface for nearly two minutes being shelled by the E-boat, a shore battery and several machine guns in the meantime.

1252B/19, Retired to seaward. Sustained no damage. Commenced reloading torpedoes.

1345B/19, Commenced closing the bay again.

1508B/19, Fired one torpedo on the surface from 1500 yards. The schooner and the E-boat blew up, one small caique stranded on the rocks.

1510B/19, Withdrew to seaward and left the area. (8)

22 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 24th war patrol (16th in the Mediterranean) at Beirut. (8)

25 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Beirut for Port Said where she was to dock. (4)

26 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Port Said. (4)

28 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) was docked at Port Said. (16)

29 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) was undocked. (16)

30 Nov 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Port Said for Beirut. (4)

1 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Beirut. (4)

6 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Beirut for her 25th war patrol (17th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. (8)

8 Dec 1943
After dark, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), entered the Kaso Strait to pass it northbound during the night. (8)

9 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) passed between Chalki and Tilos (Piskopi) Islands and then arrived in her patrol area off Cape Krio, Turkey.

During the day only Turkish vessels were seen.

In the evening HMS Sokol is ordered to patrol off Lemnos to intercept enemy shipping between Mudros and the Dardanelles. (8)

11 Dec 1943
In the morning, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), arrived in her new patrol area of Lemnos.

In the eveing Sokol claims to have attacked a medium sized merchant vessel and sunk it with one torpedo. So far we have no clue as to which ship had been attacked let alone been sunk.

(All times are zone B/-2)
2023B/11, About 12 miles east of Cape Irini, in approximate position 39°45'N, 25°42'E, a merchant vessel, thought to be of about 4500 tons, was seen at a range of only 1500 yards on a course of 150°. The ship emerged from a heavy rain squall. The Officer of the Watch, S.Lt. Fritz, immediately turned the submarine, gave the order to bring the tubes to the ready and then fired one torpedo aimed by eye. An aircraft was then sighted and Sokol crash dived. 65 Seconds after firing the torpedo an explosion was heard. HE from the target ceased immediately and breaking up noises were heard for 8 minutes.

After ten minutes Sokol surfaced. The rain had ceased. There was no sign of the target but an enormous patch of fuel was sighted. Sokol then withdrew from the area. (8)

12 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sank four Greek sailing vessels with gunfire off Lemnos Island, Greece.

The first one to be sunk, around 2110B/12, was the PI 790 / Agias Nikolaos (200 GRT).

Around 2150B/12, the SYR 436 / Agios Nikolaos (150 GRT) was sunk.

At 2202B/12, the SYR 262 / Agios Nikolaos (114 GRT) was sunk.

And finally around 2230B/12, the SYR 274 / Agios Eleimon (50 GRT) was sunk.

The schooners / caiques were sunk in approximate position 39°40'N, 25°40'E.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1930B/12, While patrolling about 10 miles east-south-east of Cape Irini, a dark silhouette was sighted bearing 300°. Course was set to intercept. Shortly afterwards a two-masted schooner under sail was recognised proceeding on course 120°. Radar gave a range of 4500 yards.

1945B/12, Dived. The schooner then passed at a distance of 500 yards. Sokol then closed to 200 yards to examine her.

2110B/12, Surfaced at a range of 2000 yards from the target and proceeded on a parallel course. Fire was then opened with the 3" gun. The third round was a hit and a small boat with 6 men left the schooner which was still under way. The schooner then opened fire with two heavy machine guns. Sokol fired 19 rounds for 14 hits which brought all the sails and the foremast down. The schooner stopped and ceased fire when the mast fell down. The target listed by the stern and about 10 men were seen to jump overboard.

During the action three schooners in line were sighted on a parallel course to the south-east. Sokol then ceased fire and went full speed towards the newcomers. They consisted of a small schooner leading the way and two larger ones 1 mile apart following the first one at 3 miles distance. Altered course so as to round the first larger schooner and attack her from astern.

2150B/12, The third schooner was now approached from astern as intended. Fire was opened from 1500 yards. The third round was a direct hit amidships. A small boat with the crew then left the schooner. Fire was withheld for a while and on passing close by, seven rounds were fired at point-blank range. Without waiting for the result, proceeded full speed towards the next one about a mile and a half ahead. This schooner was witnessing the show and a small boat with shouting men, was already in the water. Closed the schooner to 300 yards and fired ten rounds, all were hits. At 2202B/12, The schooner caught fire, capsized and sank almost simultaneously with the previous one. At this moment, 2205B/12, yet one more caique was sighted 3 miles astern. This seemed to be smaller then the first one so course was set at full speed towards the first schooner which had opened the range now to 3 miles and was approaching HMS Surf's area.

At 2230B/12, Sokol opened fire from 300 yards. The crew left the schooner at once. Fired eight rounds from point-blank range and the schooner quickly sank. Picked up three Greeks from the rowing boat and one from the water. The last caique was no longer seen, she had most likely turned back towards Mudros. (8)

15 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sinks the Greek schooner CHI 139 / Panagia (?? GRT) with a demolition charge off the Turkish coast.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0443B/15, Sighted a two-masted schooner steering 318°. She was proceeding under sail. Take up a position astern of the target. Radar picked up the echo of an aircraft coming from Lemnos. The aircraft flew over the schooner and then turned back.

0525B/15, Approached the schooner in position 39°43'N, 25°28'E and fired and fired three rounds across her bow from 4500 yards. A small boat with the crew left the schooner which was still under way. Picked up 6 Greeks and 7 Germans. Two hours were then spent to try to board the schooner which was still under motor and sails making about 8 knots. The boarding party eventually jumped over one by one. They stopped the motor, took the sails down and finally brought the schooner alongside.

All the Greeks were then transferred to the schooner and T/A/Lt. Taylor, RNVR, in charge of the boarding party, was ordered to land them on Turkish territory and then bring the schooner back. It was full daylight when the schooner parted company and she proceeded towards the Island of Tenedos on course 090 degrees.

0800B/15, Sokol dived. The north-easterly wind however was too strong for the schooner and she proceeded to Mitylene Island instead. At 10125B/15, Sokol surfaced and escorted the schooner through HMS Surf's area until Turkish territorial waters. T/A/Lt. Taylor put the Greeks on board a Turkish pilot vessel. The schooner then departed from territorial waters and when four miles from the coast, Sokol took off the boarding party and sank the schooner, which had meanwhile ran out of fuel, with a demolition charge.'

At 2000B/15, Sokol was back in her own patrol area. (8)

17 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) fired four torpedoes at the Bulgarian transport Balkan (3838 GRT, built 1914) near Mudros, Lemnos Island, Greece in position 39°44'N, 25°28'E. No hits were obtained despite the claim of two hits. The explosions heard on board ORP Sokol were possible bombs dropped by the escorting aircraft.

The Balkan was finally sunk on 23 December by HMS Sportsman.

(All times are zone B/-2)
0340B/17, While 9 miles east-south-east of Cape Irini the silhouette of a merchant vessel was sighted bearing 120°, very fine on the port bow. Range was 6000 yards. She was making a lot of smoke. Went to action stations.

0355B/17, Enemy course was 310°. Commenced attack.

0405B/17, In position 39°44'N, 25°28'E, fired four torpedoes. After firing the last torpedo an escorting aircraft sighted flying towards Sokol at close range. Sokol dived. Two explosions were heard at 1 min 27 sec and 1 min 35 sec after firing the last torpedo. No HE was heard afterwards on Asdic but loud cracking noises were heard for several minutes. (8)

19 Dec 1943
At 2300B/19, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area off Lemnos to return to Beirut. (8)

24 Dec 1943
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 25th war patrol (17th in the Mediterranean) at Beirut. (8)

9 Jan 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Beirut for her 26th war patrol (18th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. (8)

11 Jan 1944
At 2100B/11, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered the Aegean. (8)

12 Jan 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) sank the Greek caique CHN 53 / Agia Paraskevi (22 GRT) with gunfire about 15 nautical miles south-east of Cape Stili, Milos Island, Greece in position 36°30'N, 24°14'E.

(All times are zone B/-2)
2230B/12, In position 36°30'N, 24°14'E sighted a small silhouette bearing 250°, distance 4 miles. Turned towards and commenced closing.

2246B/12, Identified the target as a 40 ton single masted caique, steering south.

2312B/12, Closed to 700 yards keeping her against the moon and fired 5 rounds from the 3" gun. The caique quickly sank.

2330B/12, Picked up a rowing boat with 5 Greeks. Landed them shortly afterwards on Amenes Island with a small store of food. The caique had been bound for Crete with a cargo of various tinned and dried foods.

15 Jan 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) is detected and depth charged by German A/S vessels north-north-east of Anti-Milos. Only minor damage is sustained though.

(All times are zone B/-2)
1825B/15, While making ready to surface in position 36°52'N, 24°16'E, HE was heard on Asdic bearing 290°, changing slowly to 310°. The HE originated from a diesel engine.

1830B/15, Altered course to 210° and while HE was bearing 355°. Sokol started to surface at 200 revs without blowing main ballasts, the sea being very calm. There was no moon. Nothing was seen through the periscope and it was intended to surface before the target placed itself against the land to the eastward.

1835B/15, While Sokol was just breaking surface at 15 feet, very loud HE was heard in the fore-ends and wardroom, crossing the bow very close. This was not heard previously on Asdic. Sokol dived with 'Q' tank to 90 feet altering course to the westward. Two distinct sets of HE were heard, now close by, one with slow revs withdrawing to 320°, the second one closing to attack. One depth charge was dropped close by. Went deep to 180 feet at 200 revs, shutting off for depth charging.

1837B/15, The first attack came from the starboard beam by fast HE. A pattern of 5 depth charges was dropped nearly overhead, shaking Sokol terribly. HE passed on the port side, turned, came back and dropped another pattern of 7 depth charges right overhead. Fortunately these were all set very shallow.

No.5 port Kingston was not yet fully shut when the first attack developed Sokol was blown down to 230 feet and the Kingston jammed. After the second attack, Sokol was blown down again to 300 feet and the relief valve on No.5 vent started leaking. Half closed the valve, about 20 gallons of water flooding the control room. Two more deliberate attacks were made with HE passing right over, and approaching on each occasion from the beam, although course was altered 80° after depth charging. No depth charges were dropped and HE was then heard searching further away.

With speed increased to 400 revs Sokol was still sinking t0 330 feet, then No.1 and No.6 had to be blown slightly. Came up to 250 feet. The jammed Kingston was then shut but HE was heard to close rapidly, and speed had to be reduced to 200 revs. Sokol sank to 290 feet again and while HE was passing close by No.1 and No.6 had to be blown again. HE passed and faded away. With the fore hatch leaking Sokol was brought to 250 feet at 200 revs. These was a heavy layer at 250 feet and speed had to be increased to 300 revs to pass through. While at 230 feet the submarine rose rapidly to the surface and was not stopped by increasing speed to 400 revs and flooding 'Q' tank until No.1 and No.6 vents were opened.

1844B/15, HE was heard faintly from time to time to the north and north-east and Sokol withdrew to the westward steadying on course 280°. No major defects resulted except some bulbs, glasses and gauges broken, fuses out and superficial damage to W/T, Radar and Echo sounding equipment. The fore hatch was leaking at 250 feet.

2035B/15, Surfaced four miles north of Anti-Milos and left the area. It was a very dark night, nothing was seen and nothing was picked up by radar. (8)

17 Jan 1944
At 0740B/17, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) dived for the day in her new patrol area, the north-east approaches to the Doro Channel. (8)

21 Jan 1944
At 0300B/21, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area off the Doro Channel to proceed to patrol off Tenedos Island as ordered by Capt. S.1. (8)

23 Jan 1944
At 0200B/23, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived in her new patrol area north of Amorgos having been ordered to patrol there instead of near Tenedos the previous day. (8)

24 Jan 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed her patrol area to return to Beirut. (8)

28 Jan 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 26th war patrol (18th in the Mediterranean) at Beirut. (8)

12 Feb 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Beirut for her 27th war patrol (19th in the Mediterranean). She was ordered to patrol in the Aegean. (8)

14 Feb 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) entered the Aegean through the Scarpanto Strait. (8)

14 Feb 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) is ordered to patrol on the route Salonika - Skiathos Channel. (8)

16 Feb 1944
On this day ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) several times received new patrol orders. The latest orders received ordered her to patrol north of 39°30'N, and west of 24°01'E. (8)

17 Feb 1944
At 0430B/17, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC), arrived in her patrol area.

At 1930B/17, ORP Sokol is ordered to leave patrol and carry out a sweep south of Lemnos during the night and then proceed to the Kaso Strait. (8)

20 Feb 1944
During the night of 20/21 February 1944, ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed the Aegean to proceed to Malta. (8)

25 Feb 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) ended her 27th war patrol (19th in the Mediterranean) at Malta. (8)

6 Mar 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Malta for Gibraltar. Sokol is to return to the U.K. to refit.

Passage to Gibraltar was made in convoy MKS 42 together with HMS Torbay (Lt. R.J. Clutterbuck, RN). (8)

12 Mar 1944
ORP Sokol (Kpt.mar. (Lt.Cdr.) J.K. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Gibraltar. (8)

20 Mar 1944
HMS Torbay and (Lt. R.J. Clutterbuck, RN) and ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Gibraltar for Plymouth. The submarines were escorted by the armed yacht HMS Evadne (T/Lt. H.N. Taylor, RNR) until 0200/24. (17)

30 Mar 1944
HMS Torbay and (Lt. R.J. Clutterbuck, RN) and ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Plymouth. They were escorted in by HMS Ambrose Pare (Ch.Skr. J.W. Morris, RNR). (17)

15 May 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Plymouth for Blyth via the Clyde and Scapa Flow. (4)

21 May 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Blyth where she was to refit. (4)

1 Jun 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) was taken in hand for refit by the Blyth Dry Dock Co. (4)

20 Sep 1944
Having completed her refit, ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC), proceeded from Blyth to the Tyne. (4)

22 Sep 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC), proceeded from the Tyne to Rosyth. (4)

25 Sep 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) proceeded from Rosyth to Dundee. At Dundee she was assingned to training duties for Polish submarine ratings and also for A/S training. (18)

26 Oct 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) proceeded from Dundee to Leith. (18)

29 Oct 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) proceeded from Leith to Dundee. (18)

18 Nov 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) departed Dundee for Lerwick. She made the passage together with FFS Rubis (Lt.Cdr. H.L.G. Rousselot). They were escorted by the British armed trawler HMS William Brady (T/A/Ch.Skr. J.G. Smith, RNR). (8)

20 Nov 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC) arrived at Lerwick. She departed for her 28th war patrol later the same day. She was ordered to patrol off Skudesnes Fjord, Norway. (8)

30 Nov 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC and Bar) ended her 28th war patrol at Leriwck. (8)

1 Dec 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC and Bar) departed Lerwick for Dundee. She was escorted by HMS Loch Monteith (T/Lt. W.E. Turner, RNVR). (8)

2 Dec 1944
ORP Sokol (Lt.Cdr. J. Koziolkowski, DSC and Bar) arrived at Dundee. She now resumed her training duties. (19)

27 May 1945
ORP Sokol (Por.mar. (S.Lt) T. Bernas) was docked at Dundee. (4)

5 Jun 1945
ORP Sokol (Por.mar. (S.Lt) T. Bernas) was undocked. (4)

Media links


Stand by to Surface

Baxter, Richard

Sources

  1. ADM 199/400
  2. ADM 53/115112
  3. ADM 53/115113
  4. ADM 199/2570
  5. AMD 199/400
  6. Portsmouth Dockyard docking register
  7. ADM 199/400 + ADM 199/1854
  8. ADM 199/1854
  9. ADM 199/400 + ADM 199/2570
  10. ADM 199/424
  11. ADM 53/116198
  12. ADM 53/115945
  13. ADM 53/115946
  14. ADM 199/627
  15. ADM 199/2259
  16. ADM 199/1916
  17. ADM 199/1854 + ADM 199/1868
  18. ADM 199/1385 + ADM 199/2570
  19. ADM 199/1854 + ADM 199/2570

ADM numbers indicate documents at the British National Archives at Kew, London.


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